Exterior at night

The Center at night

Side Entrance

The entrance of the CSGS

Heather Love audience

The audience listens as Lauren Berlant introduces Heather Love in 2014

Class discussion

Students participate in a classroom discussion at the Center

Héctor Carrillo

Héctor Carrillo talks with students after his book talk in 2018

Joan Scott

Joan Scott speaking at the Center in 2017

panel

Students listen to panelists present in 2017

Community room

The Community Room at 5733 S University

center door

Center entrance

5733 exterior

The exterior of 5733 S University

Bhanu Kapil

Poet Bhanu Kapil at the Center in 2016

Annual Lectures

Iris Marion Young Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Each year, CSGS hosts the Iris Marion Young Distinguished Faculty Lecture featuring University of Chicago faculty doing innovative interdisciplinary work. On Monday, February 18, Jennifer Wild (Associate Professor, Departments of Cinema and Media Studies and Romance Languages and Literatures) will deliver the 2019 lecture titled, "How to See One Man's Body: An Experiment in Historical Perception."

We think we know certain images well, but with continued scrutiny they provide new historical perceptions and knowledge. This talk will explore the cinematic image of one man’s body, examining how it functions as a multi-faceted repository for human history and an anthropological network of visual and cultural relations. These give voice to muted histories of the French Empire including its colonial penal practices that, in the case of this body, reveal themselves under the sign of his flesh.

As part of its tenth anniversary celebration in 2006, the Center renamed this annual lecture to honor Iris Marion Young. Young was a professor of political science at the University of Chicago and was affiliated with the Center and the Human Rights program. She was a widely known and well-respected contemporary political and feminist social theorist, concerned with normative analysis of public policy. Learn more about Iris Marion Young.

Past speakers include: Linda Zerilli (Political Science), Daisy Delogu (Romance Languages & Literatures), Martha Nussbaum (Law/Philosophy), Jennifer Cole (Comparative Human Development), Deborah Nelson (English), Susan Gal (Anthropology), Leora Auslander (History), Cathy J. Cohen (Political Science), Mary Anne Case (Law), Lauren Berlant (English), Christine Stansell (History), Martha McClintock (Psychology/Comparative Human Development), Jean Comaroff (Anthropology), Amy Hollywood (Divinity), George Chauncey (History), Wendy Doniger (Divinity), Jacqueline Bhabha (Human Rights), and Saba Mahmood (Anthropology.)

Distinguished Alumnae/i Lectures

Each Spring, the CSGS welcomes a UChicago alumnae/i working in the field of gender and sexuality back to present their work. On Monday, April 16, Joseph J. Fischel, PhD '11 (Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Yale University) delivered the 2018 Distinguished Alumnae/i Lecture, “Kink & Football, Consent & Dignity” :

BDSM draws its moral, political, even erotic energies from consent talk. Yet erotic cannibalism and other lethal sex practices challenge consent as a guarantor of permissible, let alone good, sex. If consent does not vindicate any and all rough sex, what about other rough play, like football? Fischel argues that analogizing kinky sex to football to legitimate the former ultimately indicts the latter. Drawing on material from his forthcoming manuscript, "Screw Consent," and from his current research on the conceptual promiscuity of dignity, Fischel proposes that neither consent nor dignity deliver the sexual politics they promise.