Exterior at night

The Center at night

Side Entrance

The entrance of the CSGS

Heather Love audience

The audience listens as Lauren Berlant introduces Heather Love in 2014

Class discussion

Students participate in a classroom discussion at the Center

Héctor Carrillo

Héctor Carrillo talks with students after his book talk in 2018

Joan Scott

Joan Scott speaking at the Center in 2017

panel

Students listen to panelists present in 2017

Community room

The Community Room at 5733 S University

center door

Center entrance

5733 exterior

The exterior of 5733 S University

Bhanu Kapil

Poet Bhanu Kapil at the Center in 2016

Courses

Please note that Winter and Spring courses will be updated later in the year.

Undergraduate Courses

AUTUMN 2018

WINTER 2019

SPRING 2019

 

Graduate Courses

AUTUMN 2018

WINTER 2019

SPRING 2019

 

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

AUTUMN 2018

GNSE 10310 Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Instructors: Lauren Berlant, Kristen Schilt
This is a one-quarter, seminar-style introductory course for undergraduates. Its aim is triple: to engage scenes and concepts central to the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality; to provide familiarity with key theoretical anchors for that study; and to provide skills for deriving the theoretical bases of any kind of method. Students will produce descriptive, argumentative, and experimental engagements with theory and its scenes as the quarter progresses. Prior course experience in gender/sexuality studies (by way of the general education civilization studies courses or other course work) is strongly advised.

GNSE 11008 Problems in the Study of Gender and Sexuality: Gender and Religion
Instructor: Kelli Gardner
In what ways are notions of ideas about religion and the sacred gendered and what are the consequences of this for how we live our lives? This class will be an introduction to the study of the relationships between religion and gender and the way these relationships play out in specific historical situations. Attention will also be paid to the relationships between religions and sexualities. Examples will be drawn from medieval to modern periods, and our attention will primarily be on Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

GNSE 15002 Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations
Instructors: Amanda Blair, Susan Burns, Andrea Ford, Rochona Majumdar, Tien-Tien Jong
The first quarter offers a theoretical framing unit that introduces concepts in feminist, gender, and queer theory, as well as two thematic clusters, “Kinship” and “Creativity and Cultural Knowledge.” The “Kinship” cluster includes readings on such topics as marriage, sex and anti-sex, love and anti-love, and reproduction. The “Creativity and Cultural Knowledge” cluster addresses the themes of authorship and authority, fighting and constructing the canon, and the debates over the influence of “difference” on cultural forms.
This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

GNSE 18500 American Horrors
Instructor: Michael Dango
This course is a survey of horror in American literature and film, with a special focus on the genre’s relation to racial and sexual violence. How does horror reflect, contribute to, or intervene into structures of racism, sexism, xenophobia, and queerphobia? How do fictional texts represent or transform non-fictional horrors, from lynching to rape to police brutality? And what is the status of horror as an emotion that structures relations of power and privilege in the United States? Together, we will gain a historical perspective on the genre, for instance tracking the figure of the zombie from its birth in Haitian folklore as a projection of the horrors of slavery, through 20th century works like George Romero’s film Night of the Living Dead, and into present day works including Colson Whitehead’s novel Zone One. We will pay special attention to the present moment, interrogating a renaissance of horror tropes in, for instance, feminist fiction (Karen Russell and Carmen Maria Machado), television (American Horror Story and Stranger Things), and cinema (It and Get Out). 

GNSE 20036 Making Sex and Race on the Renaissance Stage
Instructor: Ellen MacKay
This course examines some of the greatest hits of the non-Shakespearean repertoire to discuss the central role of the raced and sexed body on the Renaissance stage. We will put under special scrutiny the tendency of playwrights to dramatize for display virginity, pregnancy, and venereal disease as they intersect with a wide spectrum racial difference. Social, medical, and ecclesiastical history will be important to our discussions, but the aim of the course is to investigate the theatrical implications of this raced and sexed dramaturgy; in particular, we will consider how the plays of the Tudor-Stuart era that hinge on biological ‘facts’ call for exhibitions of anatomical proof that they would seem to be entirely incapable of mustering.

Students should expect extensive (but lively) weekly reading assignments, preparation for which includes participation in a calendar of class responses; a presentation to the class of a self-selected primary text; and a culminating research essay.

GNSE 20072 Frankenstein at 200: Hideous Progeny
Instructor: Alexis Chema
2018 marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, arguably the most famous horror story ever written. Frankenstein is also a mythopoetic tour de force whose searching moral and ethical questions—at what cost should we pursue scientific advances, or seek knowledge more generally? What are the effects of social marginalization? Where is the boundary between the drive to create and the desire for power?—command more attention today than ever. In this seminar we will examine the novel both as it engaged earlier cultural works (Plutarch’s Lives, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Godwin’s Political Justice, Wollstonecraft’sVindication of the Rights of Woman, Goethe’s Sorrows of Young Werther), and as it morphed over the course of two centuries into a full-blown modern myth. Indeed, its adaptations, scholarly editions, imitations, and parodies are legion, spanning nineteenth-century melodramas, popular songs, numerous blockbuster films (including the prequel to Ridley Scott’s Aliens saga), comic books, a new Netflix miniseries, and even, rather amazingly, at least one children’s book series. We will have the unique opportunity of attending the world premier of the newest stage interpretation of Shelley’s novel at the Court Theatre and discussing the projects of adaptation and remediation with its director and cast. Students will have the option of producing their own creative adaptation as their culminating project for the course.

GNSE 21001 Cultural Psychology
Instructor: Richard Shweder
There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world. Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning.

GNSE 21416 Reproduction and Motherhood in Multimedia
Instructor: Margaret Carlyle
What do artificial wombs, monstrous creations, and dystopian medical landscapes have in common? Answers to these questions are the subject of this interdisciplinary course in which we explore the many ways in which human reproduction has entered multimedia from the eighteenth century through present. In our course, the concept of "reproduction" will be problematized through film, advertising, texts, literature, and objects. Through these sources, we will critically explore how popular representations of human reproduction have shaped the status of the female body and notions of motherhood over time. We will also see how the liberating potential of new forms of multimedia have often served to reinforce--rather than resist or re-imagine--longstanding motifs and beliefs surrounding the maternal body and womanhood, from the image of the hysterical woman to that of the monstrous mother. Themes covered include the science of reproduction, hysteria, monstrosities, maternal imagination, artificial life, race, contraception, in/fertility, and sex education.

GNSE 22204 Philosophies of Environmentalism and Sustainability
Instructor: Bart Schultz
Many of the toughest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, pollution, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions presented by such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What do the terms "nature" and "wilderness" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral and/or legal standing? What fundamental ethical and political perspectives inform such positions as ecofeminism, the "Land Ethic," political ecology, ecojustice, and deep ecology? And does the environmental crisis confronting the world today demand new forms of ethical and political philosophizing and practice? Are we in the Anthropocene? Is "adaptation" the best strategy at this historical juncture? Field trips, guest speakers, and special projects will help us philosophize about the fate of the earth by connecting the local and the global. 

GNSE 22110 Excrement and Ecstasy: The Devotional Body in Early Modern Literature
Instructor: Beatrice Bradley
This class asks why writers in the seventeenth century turn to bodily metaphor and erotic language to describe their interactions with the divine. We will investigate the materiality of the body in early modern poetry—where it is frequently depicted as in orgasmic frenzy, failing, and even producing excrement—and its involvement with religious devotional practice. Authors of focus will likely include William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert, John Milton, and Margaret Cavendish. 

GNSE 23002 Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex and Gender
Instructor: Mary Anne Case (note – this is a .50 unit course)
This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse.

GNSE 23100 Foucalt and the History of Sexuality
Instructor: Arnold Ira Davidson
This course centers on a close reading of the first volume of Michel Foucault's "The History of Sexuality", with some attention to his writings on the history of ancient conceptualizations of sex. How should a history of sexuality take into account scientific theories, social relations of power, and different experiences of the self? We discuss the contrasting descriptions and conceptions of sexual behavior before and after the emergence of a science of sexuality. Other writers influenced by and critical of Foucault are also discussed.

GNSE 23118 Gender and Sexuality in Jewish Society: Early Modernity through the Present
Instructor: Anna Band
In this course, we will examine how gender and sexuality shaped Jewish historical experience, identity, ideology, and imagination from the mid-seventeenth century until today. Using the tools of gender analysis, we will explore the historical realities of women and men in Jewish society through critical reading of primary sources (in translation), and discussion of modern research. No prior background in Jewish Studies is necessary. Topics include: the construction of gender in modern Jewish society; historical intersections of sexuality and Jewish practice; gender and power relations in the Jewish family; emancipation and assimilation; gender and Jewish literature; Jews and the rise of feminist movements; masculinity and Zionism; sex, gender, and the Holocaust.

GNSE 25600 Gender and Modernity in Colonial Korea
Instructor: Kyeong-Hee Choi
What are the salient forms, manifestations, and performances that can be discussed as aspects found at the intersection between gender experience and Korean colonial modernity? This seminar aims at identifying the characteristics of Japanese or colonially mediated modernization that Koreans experienced in the first half of the twentieth century in order to ultimately generate a broadly meaningful discussion on the texture of colonial cultural experience under its abiding colonial legacy. At the core of the class is a concern with gender. While considering the universal questions of modernized gender, gendered consciousness, and personal/private spaces, discussions will respond to the diverse interests and backgrounds of student participants so as to best facilitate comparative and theoretical discussions on colonial modernity and its postcolonial manifestations.

GNSE 28202 United States Latinos: Origins and Histories
Instructor: Ramon Gutierrez
An examination of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural histories of those who are now commonly identified as Latinos in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formative historical experiences of Mexican Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, although some consideration will also be given to the histories of other Latino groups, i.e., Cubans, Central Americans, and Dominicans. Topics include cultural and geographic origins and ties; imperialism and colonization; the economics of migration and employment; legal status; work, women, and the family; racism and other forms of discrimination; the politics of national identity; language and popular culture; and the place of Latinos in US society. 

GNSE 28401 Gender in the Classroom
Instructor: Emily Lyons
No inherent difference in general intelligence or academic ability have been found between males and females, despite extensive research on the topic. However, gendered patterns of learning and achievement persist. In the US, girls outperform boys on tests of reading and literacy, earn better grades, and are more likely to graduate high school and enroll in college. At the same time, while boys and girls now perform similarly on most tests of math and science achievement, boys are still more likely than girls to take Advanced Placement tests in STEM-related fields during high school, and ultimately to pursue STEM Careers.

This course focuses on the ways in which gender shapes student’s classroom experiences, and how these gendered interactions may contribute to the persistence of gendered patterns of achievement outcomes, within the context of US K-12 classrooms. We will draw on perspectives from several disciplines, including Psychology, Anthropology and Sociology. 

Because this course provides a context for students to explore and critically reflect on the ways in which gender shapes student experiences within the context of US K-12 classrooms, the course may hold particular appeal for undergraduates considering pursuing careers as educators, and for those who desire a space to explore and reflect on the role of gender in shaping their own educational experiences thus far.

WINTER 2019

GNSE 11009 Problems in the Study of Gender and Sexuality: The Big Issues
Instructors: Linda Zerilli, Amanda Blair
This course will address contemporary major issues in feminist and queer theory.

GNSE 15003 Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations
Instructors: Amanda Blair, Andrea Ford, Sue Gal, Sonali Thakkar, TBD
Three thematic clusters make up the second quarter. “Politics” focuses on texts related to activism/movement politics and women’s rights as human rights and the question of universalism. “Religion” contextualizes gender and sexuality through examinations of a variety of religious laws and teachings, religious practices, and religious communities. “Economics” looks at slavery, domestic service, prostitution as labor, consumption, and the gendering of labor in contemporary capitalism.

GNSE 21400 Advanced Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Linda Zerilli
This course examines contemporary theories of sexuality, culture, and society. We then situate these theories in global and historical perspectives. Topics and issues are explored through theoretical, ethnographic, and popular film and video texts. Our itinerary in this coursewill be interdisciplinary, ranging from political theory to science studies. Topics for discussion will likely include: the gendering of reason and passion in the history of philosophy; the power, persistence, and flexibility of norms; the relationship between eros and other forms of desire; the division of labor and other economic tributaries to gendered experience; openings for and challenges to the political aspirations of sexual (and other) minorities; and the pressures exerted by technology on erotic life. Students will engage key concepts in the field, and will be encouraged to experiment with new ones.

SPRING 2019

GNSE 11005 Problems in the Study of Gender and Sexuality: Media Wars
Instructors: Jennifer Wild, Lara Janson
In our contemporary moment, we have become accustomed to terms such as 'counter-terrorism' that signal an effort to resist internal and external threats, and those suggesting that we live in an age of 'post-truth' dominated by 'corporate-media,' 'fake news,' and 'fact-challenged' journalism. Taking this platform as our starting place, this class explores how these terms and their use have been gendered; have situated both gender and sexuality as either weapons of resistance or objects of destruction. This class will be historically organized insofar as we will begin our discussion with ways that media - broadly conceived to include cinema, print and visual-cultural forms, television, and the internet - have aimed to 'counter' patriarchal, heteronormative, and hegemonic systems of representation of gender and sexuality. 

GNSE 21112 Nudes, Princess, and Cyborges: Gender, Violence, and Biblical Fiction
Instructor: Chloe Blackshear
To many, Bathsheba is simply the nude who seduced David. The connotations of being a Jezebel are strong enough that a popular feminist website re-appropriates the insult. Yet the biblical texts themselves make it difficult to imagine female characters as types, or the violence with which they are often associated as comprehensible. Furthermore, Hebrew Bible figures have often been taken up as sites to explore contemporary questions relating to gender and violence. Did Dinah 'ask for it'? Does Ruth's story celebrate the refugee and mother or justify a colonial politics of assimilation? In this course, students will examine literary works that reuse difficult portions of biblical narrative and challenge readers to reassess biblical violence and its legacies. By engaging with both more popular extended rewritings like The Red Tent and world-literary political works like A Grain of Wheat, this course will reconsider biblical women and the variety of problematic and productive ways they may be appropriated in fiction and in popular culture.

GNSE 23119 Transnational Queer Politics and Practices
Instructor: Caterina Fugazzola
This course aims to examine gender and sexual practices and identities in a transnational perspective. As people and ideas move across national, cultural, and racial borders, how is sexuality negotiated and redefined? How are concepts such as “global queerness” and the globalization of sexualities leveraged for change? How are queer identities and practices translated, both culturally and linguistically? To explore transnational articulations of queerness we will draw on a range of theoretical perspectives, including postcolonial, feminist, queer, and indigenous approaches to the study of sexualities. We will engage with scholarship on the politics of global gay rights discourses, on the sexual politics of migration, and on the effects of colonialism and neoliberal capitalism. By analyzing queer experiences and practices in a transnational context, our goal is to decenter and challenge Western-centric epistemologies and to dive into the complexities of cultural representations of queerness around the globe.

GNSE 23120 Topics in Feminism and Psychoanalysis
Instructors: Uday Jain, Agatha Slupek
Questions of the personal, narrative, and fantastical elements of human life are fundamental to both feminism and psychoanalysis. Each tradition has stressed the importance of embodied experience to understanding, as well as the relation of that experience to large-scale social and political structures. How do structures of domination and oppression affect the way we experience desire, or who we desire in the first place? How do our dreams and fantasies block us from, or propel us toward, the imagination and enactment of feminist futures? How does loss circumscribe gender and racial identity? What’s with mothers? And if it hurts me, why do I keep doing it? These and other questions of practical and political import will guide our trajectory in this interdisciplinary advanced undergraduate course.

In Part I, we will “work through” the analytic categories developed by Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan in their psychoanalytic practice. Particular attention will be paid to specific case studies. In Part II, we will turn to topics in feminist, gender and sexuality studies that have taken inspiration from, or developed as critiques of, psychoanalysis. We will think feminism expansively, drawing from critical race theory, queer theory, political theory, philosophy, literature, and cultural studies to explore psychoanalytic topics.

GNSE 23121 The Politics of Life Itself
Instructor: Vinh Cam
This is an introductory course on biopolitics. The class will approach this Foucauldian category as both a “style of thought” and as a mode of governmentality. Key questions we will return to throughout the quarter include: What forms of knowledge-power are mobilized to conceive of life statistically and/or at the level of population? How might biopolitics transform our understanding of sexuality, race, and class, as well as their disciplinary systems? And, finally, what does it mean to politicize “life itself”? In order to get a better handle on Michel Foucault’s foundational formulation of biopolitics in the final chapter of The History of Sexuality, we will spend the first two weeks tracing the concept’s prehistory in the work of Charles Darwin and the life philosophers of the Nineteenth Century before turning to contemporary theorizations of biopolitics by feminist, critical race, disability, and queer scholars. These recent interventions alert us to the different instantiations or modalities of biopolitics in relation to one’s geo-political location and/or subject-position. For some, biopolitics has the potential to foster new forms of life and capacities; for others, this politics of life is more likely to be encountered as a necropolitics. We will therefore spend the final few weeks of the quarter thinking about the relation between life and death under biopolitics. How might the biopolitical revision of life alter our understanding of death itself?

GNSE 23122 Taboo and Transgression
Instructor: Alexander Wolfson
This course circulates around five questions: 1) what does it mean to conceive of the foundations of society as forming through structures of prohibition, 2) why is it that these prohibitions primarily take the form of sexual regulation, 3) what are the gendered dynamics of these prohibitions, 4) why are these conceptions always formulated through studies of cultural otherness, 5) what dangers and potentialities reside within the concept of transgression? As is clear from these fundamental questions,this class is not primarily a study of taboo as a theoretical concept, but rather of the ways in which the concept of taboo is used in specific discourses internal to 20th and 21st-century social sciences, cultural theory and psychoanalysis.

 

Graduate Course Descriptions

AUTUMN 2018

GNSE 31000 Cultural Psychology
Instructor: Richard Shweder
There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world. Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning.

GNSE 33022 Workshop: Regulation of Family, Sex and Gender
Instructor: Mary Ann Case
This workshop exposes students to recent academic work in the regulation of family, sex, gender, and sexuality and in feminist theory. Workshop sessions are devoted to the presentation and discussion of papers from outside speakers and University faculty. The substance and methodological orientation of the papers will both be diverse.

GNSE 35600 Gender and Modernity in Colonial Korea
Instructor: Kyeong-Hee Choi
What are the salient forms, manifestations, and performances that can be discussed as aspects found at the intersection between gender experience and Korean colonial modernity? This seminar aims at identifying the characteristics of Japanese or colonially mediated modernization that Koreans experienced in the first half of the twentieth century in order to ultimately generate a broadly meaningful discussion on the texture of colonial cultural experience under its abiding colonial legacy. At the core of the class is a concern with gender. While considering the universal questions of modernized gender, gendered consciousness, and personal/private spaces, discussions will respond to the diverse interests and backgrounds of student participants so as to best facilitate comparative and theoretical discussions on colonial modernity and its postcolonial manifestations.

GNSE 38202 United States Latinos: Origins and Histories
Instructor: Ramon Gutierrez
An examination of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural histories of those who are now commonly identified as Latinos in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formative historical experiences of Mexican Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, although some consideration will also be given to the histories of other Latino groups, i.e., Cubans, Central Americans, and Dominicans. Topics include cultural and geographic origins and ties; imperialism and colonization; the economics of migration and employment; legal status; work, women, and the family; racism and other forms of discrimination; the politics of national identity; language and popular culture; and the place of Latinos in US society. 

GNSE 44202 Psychoanalysis, Literature and Film
Instructor: Maud Ellman
We will read major works by Freud, Melanie Klein, D.W. Winnicott, and Slavoj Žižek, among other psychoanalytic theorists, in conjunction with literary works such as Sophocles's Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's Hamlet, Edgar Allan Poe's "The Purloined Letter," Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, and Rudyard Kipling's "Mary Postgate." The course will conclude with one or more of Alfred Hitchcock's films. Topics include the unconscious, dreams, childhood, the uncanny, desire, subjects and objects, mourning, and the death drive. Requirements: one paper 10-12 pages, joint presentations in class, and regular postings to the online discussion board.

GNSE 44214 Gender, Health and Medicine
Instructor: Anna Mueller
From the day we are born til the day we die, we experience a gendered world that shapes our opportunities, our social interactions, and even our physical health and wellbeing. This course will provide an introduction to sociological perspectives on gender, physical and mental health, and medicine while also providing a deep interrogation of the social, institutional, and biological links between gender and health. We will discuss inequalities in morbidity, mortality, and health behaviors of women, men, and transgendered individuals from different race, ethnic, and class backgrounds, and we will use sociological concepts, theories, and methods to understand why these differences appear. Finally, we will examine how medicine as an institution and medical practices as organizations sometimes contribute to and combat gender inequality in health. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with social scientific perspectives on (1) gender, (2) mental and physical health, and (3) the practice of medicine, as well as some of the fundamental debates in current medical sociology and sociology of gender.

GNSE 50002 Colloquium: Africa in the Era of the Transatlantic Slave Trade
Instructor: Emily Osborn
This graduate course explores the history of the slave trade and the making of the Atlantic World using a range of secondary and primary sources, from oral traditions to digital datasets to diaries and ship records. We will start by examining African social and political systems prior to European contact and then investigate the emergence of the slave trade as a major force of change across the oceanic basin. Themes of study include oral, archaeological, and textual sources of history; definitions and practices of slavery; the dynamics of trade, gender, warfare, and enslavement; and the making of the Atlantic World.

GNSE 60300 Colloquium: Immigration and Assimilation in American Life
Instructor: Ramon Gutierrez
This course explores the history of immigration in what is now the United States, starting with the colonial origins of Spanish, French, Dutch, and English settlements, the importation of African slaves, and the massive waves of immigrants that arrived in the nineteenth and twentieth century. Additionally, we will study the adaptation of these immigrants, exploring the validity of the concept of assimilation, comparing and contrasting the experiences of the "old" and "new" immigrants based on their race, religion, and class standing.

WINTER 2019

GNSE 31400 Advanced Theories of Gender and Sexuality
Instructor: Linda Zerilli
This course examines contemporary theories of sexuality, culture, and society. We then situate these theories in global and historical perspectives. Topics and issues are explored through theoretical, ethnographic, and popular film and video texts. Our itinerary in this coursewill be interdisciplinary, ranging from political theory to science studies. Topics for discussion will likely include: the gendering of reason and passion in the history of philosophy; the power, persistence, and flexibility of norms; the relationship between eros and other forms of desire; the division of labor and other economic tributaries to gendered experience; openings for and challenges to the political aspirations of sexual (and other) minorities; and the pressures exerted by technology on erotic life. Students will engage key concepts in the field, and will be encouraged to experiment with new ones.

GNSE 41500 Bodies of Transformation
Instructor: TBD       
Drawing on trans studies, disability studies, histories of science, queer and postcolonial theory, this class contends with how bodies and bodies of knowledge change over time. Bodies of Transformation takes a historiographic approach to the social, political, and cultural underpinnings of corporeal meaning, practice and performance in the 19th and 20th centuries. Animating questions include: what is the corporeal real? how is race un/like gender? how does bodily transformation map the complex relationships between coercion and choice?

SPRING 2019

GNSE 31005 Problems in the Study of Gender and Sexuality: Media Wars
Instructors: Jennifer Wild, Lara Janson
In our contemporary moment, we have become accustomed to terms such as 'counter-terrorism' that signal an effort to resist internal and external threats, and those suggesting that we live in an age of 'post-truth' dominated by 'corporate-media,' 'fake news,' and 'fact-challenged' journalism. Taking this platform as our starting place, this class explores how these terms and their use have been gendered; have situated both gender and sexuality as either weapons of resistance or objects of destruction. This class will be historically organized insofar as we will begin our discussion with ways that media - broadly conceived to include cinema, print and visual-cultural forms, television, and the internet - have aimed to 'counter' patriarchal, heteronormative, and hegemonic systems of representation of gender and sexuality.